JEREMY COMBOT

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Fashion Editor | Carlotta Santigli


Halfway between pop and nostalgic. Halfway between colorful and romantic. In a world ruled by new media his creations are a change to dream and stare at details. His masterpieces will make you want to pick up a pen and start drawing. He is fresh, cool and made in Paris. Let’s get into this truly innovative guy’s mind.   

A young french illustrator, born in Paris. How much does France influence your work?
France has a historical influence on my work. I am so passionate about its intense past: I love picking some details from it and modernize them. Most of all, I am attracted to some French history icons in their temporal environments, such as Marie Antoinette in her Petit Trianon pretending to be a farmer to get out of her boring life; Sarah Berhnardt playing Phèdre; Juliette Greco talking about philosophy with Boris Vian and all the Parisian intellectuals in a Saint-Germain-des-Prés bar; Niki de Saint Phalle shooting her own paintings with a gun; Jane Birkin and Serge Gainsbourg recording the scandalous Je t’aime… moi non plus song.

Your style is eclectic; still it is very regognizable and unique. Can we do a comparison of what you do and who you are?
Of course we can in a way: as an artist, I always put all myself in my work and at the same time art is a powerful medium to get into an imaginary world. What a paradoxe! I am nota s excentric as my characters but the eclecticism I express represents also what I like in my everyday life.

It seems like you are very close to PopCulture, a fiercely criticised phenomenon characterized by photos, videos, mass media and flash-stuff. However,in a certain way we can say that you ennoble the Pop world with your drawings, giving the handmade factor to it. Do you agree?
I absolutely do. The world has been rewritten in 80s and 90s, when the PopCulture was born. We are now living an outbidding of the information, the image and the sound. Plus, Internet quickly broke every rules of communication. This new form of freedom is amazing and terrifying at the same time, like a never stopping high-speed train that goes so fast that we can’t even see it. I really like slowing down the pace in my work, even if I often use PopCulture’s codes. It is all about mixing traditional and contemporary elements.


What kind of child were you? Do you remember the first time you realized how much you love drawing?
I was a very happy child, with a lot of energy and imagination. Being the youngest child, I was quite spoiled and always tied to my mother’s apron! The freedom of expression I had is directly reflected in my life’s choices. I remember drawing was a hobby to me: copying the covers of my favourite comics Tom-Tom et Nana, illustrating the Fables of La Fontaine in my poetry notebook for school or even doodling with the markers on my bedroom’s door…

What about your passion for the fashion world? Would you like to collaborate with a designer in particular?
My interest for Fashion came with the decade of Top models. As a child of the 90s, I grew up with Claudia, Cindy, Carla and Naomi. That was when Fashion started being more mainstream and not only reserved to an elite. Later Anna Wintour started putting singers and actresses on Vogue US covers and Fashion became a full-fledge entity of PopCulture. I would LOVE to collaborate with Gucci’s creative director Alessandro Michele: his personal interpretation of past makes each collection mythical and divine. He is not just producing trendy clothes.

Can you explain the steps from the creation to the end of your works? What do you use?
First of all, I spend a lot of time shredding tones from the magazines and collecting pictures in my inspiration book: it helps me focusing and relaxing. If a specific pieces catches my eye, I start sketching a world around that, trying to give it a je ne sais quoi that makes the difference. When I am satisfied I start working on an A3 paper adding more details, such as face expression and hair. Then I use a very thin pen and after that I mix my inks and apply the colors. In the end, I erase the eventual mistakes on Photoshop and add the right background.


Do you listen to the music when you create? What kind of music do you prefer?
I like creating with loud music and I like mixing different artists such as Leonard Cohen and Christine and the Queens. But most of the time I put some pop music on.

Where are you used to work? Do you have a studio?
I work at home. I can’t afford a studio and I actually enjoy working in the place where I live.

Three idols and three muses that inspire your work.
My idols are Brigitte Fontaine, françoise Sagan and Aubrey Beardsley. There is a lot of people inspiring me, but on the top of my endless list I put the explosive Fran Fine (in her fantastic Moschino outfits), the legendary Fashion icon Iris Apfel and the techno queen Sita Abellan.


INSTAGRAM @jeremycombot

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